Two new moons for Pluto

The Hubble space telescope has discovered TWO new moons around the distant planet Pluto.
They were snapped in pictures taken a month apart by the giant eye in the sky.
The new moons, which have not yet been named, are each thought to be less than 45 miles wide.
Pluto, the ninth planet in the solar system and lying four billion miles from the sun, was already known to have one moon, Charon, which was first spotted in 1978.
Pluto is so far away that it takes over 248 YEARS to go round the sun.
Nasa’s first space mission to the planet is due to launch in January.

Caption: The images, right, from Hubble show Pluto and Charon, the two brightest objects, on May 15 (above) and May 18 (below). The two fainter objects are the new moons. Credit: NASA.

Paul Sutherland

Paul Sutherland

I have been a professional journalist for nearly 40 years. I write regularly for science magazines including BBC Sky at Night magazine, BBC Focus, Astronomy Now and Popular Astronomy. I have also authored three books on astronomy and contributed to others.
Paul Sutherland

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Paul Sutherland

I have been a professional journalist for nearly 40 years. I write regularly for science magazines including BBC Sky at Night magazine, BBC Focus, Astronomy Now and Popular Astronomy. I have also authored three books on astronomy and contributed to others.

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