No time for change

A crackpot bid to scrap leap seconds was put on hold yesterday.
Real life time lords in Geneva agreed to a rethink after complaints that it would eventually lead to the sun rising in the AFTERNOON.
A US contingent had complained that it was too difficult to adjust precise atomic clocks used by the internet and satellites.
But their move threatened the historic time-keeping system set up by Britain in the 17th century and recognised by the world.
Leap seconds are currently added to Greenwich Mean Time every 18 months or so to compensate for a gradual slowing down in the Earth’s rotation.
The next will be on New Year’s Eve.
It ensures that the sun continues to cross the prime meridian at Greenwich, that divides east and west, at noon.
The UK’s Royal Astronomical Society had protested over the proposal to
the International Telecommunications Union to scrap leap seconds.
RAS secretary Dr Mike Hapgood welcomed the decision to re-examine the issue.
He told the BBC: “It’s what we were seeking, so that’s good from our point of view.”

Paul Sutherland

Paul Sutherland

I have been a professional journalist for nearly 40 years. I write regularly for science magazines including BBC Sky at Night magazine, BBC Focus, Astronomy Now and Popular Astronomy. I have also authored three books on astronomy and contributed to others.
Paul Sutherland

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Paul Sutherland

I have been a professional journalist for nearly 40 years. I write regularly for science magazines including BBC Sky at Night magazine, BBC Focus, Astronomy Now and Popular Astronomy. I have also authored three books on astronomy and contributed to others.

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