Lust in space drives tourism

Couples will be clamouring to fly into space to enjoy out of this world sex, an expert claims.

Pioneering tourists want to make love in weightlessness while the Earth really does move beneath them.

Space writer Laura Woodmansee says enthusiasm to join the 100 mile high club will be one of the biggest forces driving the space holiday business. And she claims honeymoons in space will be a reality within ten years.

Companies like Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic, see picture, aim to begin the first passenger flights to the fringe of space within a couple of years. They have already sold more than 200 tickets at $200,000 each. But within a few years orbiting hotels will allow those with even deeper pockets to spend extended holidays in space.

Mum-of-one Laura, who has written a book, Sex In Space, is married to a rocket scientist and gives public talks as an official ambassador for Nasa in California.
In a possibly unfortunate choice of words, she says: “Sex in space is the ‘killer application’ that will transform space tourism into a mega business. Making love with a view of the Earth below may be the ultimate aphrodisiac for space buffs. The sex in space revolution is about to begin!

“Many have wondered what it might be like to make love in space. The passionate couples who book flights to the very first space hotel will be more than excited to try zero-g sex. Some people believe that space sex will be a frustrating experience and that lovers will give up. No way! Weightless couples will find a way to get together.

“The bottom line is that sex in space will probably take some practice and hard work at first. Since people are very creative, I have no doubt that it will make for a wonderful otherworldly experience.”

But Laura warns that couple should be careful not to conceive in space as not enough is known about the dangers to mothers or their babies. Foetal development and sperm movement are known to be affected by a lack of gravity and radiation from space could be a serious problem.

Laura tells Space.com that Nasa must do more testing on the consequences of sex in space. Until then, she says it is up to spaceflight companies to take their own precautions before sending couples into space.

Paul Sutherland

Paul Sutherland

I have been a professional journalist for nearly 40 years. I write regularly for science magazines including BBC Sky at Night magazine, BBC Focus, Astronomy Now and Popular Astronomy. I have also authored three books on astronomy and contributed to others.
Paul Sutherland

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Paul Sutherland

I have been a professional journalist for nearly 40 years. I write regularly for science magazines including BBC Sky at Night magazine, BBC Focus, Astronomy Now and Popular Astronomy. I have also authored three books on astronomy and contributed to others.

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